Development of a malaria DNA Vaccine

    Projektdetails

    Beschreibung

    Malaria is by far the world's most serious tropical parasitic disease, which kills more people than any other communicable disease besides tuberculosis. So far, conventional immunization strategies have yielded disappointing results, but the novel and revolutionary method of DNA-based vaccination has already proven its effectiveness against malaria infection in the mouse model.The aim of the proposed study is to improve our recently developed anti-malaria DNA vaccines, thereby reducing the amount of DNA required for protective immunity as well as the number of booster immunizations, a prerequisite for their application in developing countries. Furthermore, the question whether DNA vaccines confer protection via cytotoxic T cell responses and/or antibodies against malaria infection will be elucidated.

    a) Antigen-specific antibody production (total IgG, IgG1, IgG2a, IgM, IgE) will be determined by ELISA. Indirect immunofluorescent assay (IFA), which quantitates antibodies directed against whole sporozoites, will be performed to confirm ELISA data.
    b) Cytokines in supernatants of splenocytes re-stimulated with recombinant CSP or peptides comprising defined T-helper or CTL epitopes, will be quantified by sandwich ELISA.
    c) Isolated spleen cells of immunized mice will be evaluated for antigen-specific proliferative responses by 52 h of in-vitro re-stimulation with recombinant CSP or defined T-helper epitope peptides.
    d) Cytotoxic activities will be determined with a classical chromium release assay (CTL assay). Supernatants will be tested for IFN-γ release.
    e) CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subpopulations for transfer from protected animals to naïve mice will be isolated by MACS separation.
    f) To determine the duration and rate of protection in vaccinated mice, challenges will be performed 14, 28, and 300 days after the final immunization.


    The aim of the proposed study is to improve our recently developed anti-malaria DNA vaccines, thereby reducing the amount of DNA required for protective immunity as well as the number of booster immunizations, a prerequisite for their application in developing countries.
    KurztitelMalaria vaccine development
    StatusAbgeschlossen
    Tatsächlicher Beginn/ -es Ende1/10/0230/09/05

    Systematik der Wissenschaftszweige 2002

    • 3432 Impfstoffentwicklung
    • 3411 Immunologie